The Décor or the Dining?

You will soon see that I love food and anything related to its production or consumption. I truly believe I have thousands of fellow travelers in this regard. Let’s share ideas and restaurant reviews. You can’t have too many places to eat when your stomach is crying out. I cherish a lavish menu where I can savor many dishes without running out of choices. I am open to just about any type of cuisine from American to ethnic. I also cook a bit myself and have been known to share recipes. My favorite pastime is being a food critic as it takes me to many exotic places. If you like out-of-the ordinary fare, listen up. You have to be adventurous and open to the unknown. There isn’t much to say about the same old stuff. A burger is a burger is a burger. It must be different to get my attention. Give me something new and I am there. Meanwhile, I also pay attention to a restaurant’s vibe and clientele.

For example, I recently visited a Polynesian restaurant that served the most amazing roast pig. The tables were sparse, each decorated with gorgeous flowers that I imagine are native to the islands. But what really caught my eye was the décor. The walls were paneled with intricate woodwork that surely was all hand done. There was no machine cookie cutter craftsmanship apparent, it was a truly bespoke piece, worthy of Woodwork Nation (https://www.woodworknation.com). I loved the rich tawny color and how it created a glow inside the space. I wish that the food had been as good. So, this creates a dilemma. Do you recommend a restaurant just for its ambiance? Surely not. A place can be a dive and if it has a great menu, it will be on my list of favorites. Now what about this place? It was gorgeous. An island motif was so original and there were accoutrements everywhere that spoke of faraway places. Would I go back just to sit in all this visual luxury? I am at a crossroads. I give the restaurant an A for service, an A for décor and a lowly B for food. Ah, the life of a food critic is tough.

You must be honest when writing reviews or your readers will not trust you. You have every right to mention the woodworking or any other aspect of the décor, but for a truly balanced critique, the food should take center stage. You can’t whitewash mediocrity and get away with it. I feel bad sometimes when I must expose problems, a low health rating, or inferior dishes. I owe it to the public to put everything on line. When I do, I don’t go back lest I get ostracized. As a result, I play incognito and don’t reveal my intentions. Lately, I have been thinking about revisiting the Polynesian restaurant in case it has improved. Nothing would make me happier than letting the word get out. Then maybe the wood working won’t have to carry the day for this spot.